Alaska Knit Nat


Leave a comment

Zissou Hat — A Free Knit Cap Pattern

Some people feel strongly about Wes Anderson films. I happen to love his styles, colors, sets and costumes. When I saw an old friend post his halloween costume on his Facebook page this week, I knew I had to give it a hand-knit boost.

My buddy, Wes, is dressing up as Steve Zissou from “The Life Aquatic.” Each Cousteau-like character in the film wears a different style of bright red beanie, some with their first initials stitched in yellow.

I’ve made these hats before for my husband and son, but I didn’t bother to write a pattern.

Zissou Hat | A free knitting pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

If you’d like to make a baby version of this hat, follow this pattern, but just use red yarn (and no ears)

After making this fine cap with a small pompom, I figured it was time to share it with the world.

Zissou Hat | A free knitting pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Zissou Hat

Fits an average-sized adult head

Materials:

1 skein of Lion Brand Vanna’s Choice worsted in True Bold Red

size US 9 circular and double pointed needles

darning needle

large fork

yellow embroidery thread

Zissou Hat | A free knitting pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Abbreviations:

k1, p1 = knit 1, purl 1

k2tog = knit 2 together

Zissou Hat | A free knitting pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

With the circular needle, cast on 80 stitches. K1, p1 for seven rounds.

Knit for 34 more rounds, or until work measures about 5.5 inches from the edge.

Begin decreasing as follows:

Round 1: K2tog knit 6. Repeat for one round.
Round 2 (and all even rounds): Knit
Round 3: K2tog, K 5 for one round
Round 5:K2tog, K 4 for one round (this is where you should probably switch to the double points).
Round 7: K2tog, K 3 
Round 9:K2tog, K 2
Round 11:K2tog, K 1
Round 13: K2tog

Cut yarn leaving a 12-inch tail. WIth a darning needle, run the yarn through the remaining stitches and cinch close. Weave in all tails.

For the pompom:

Zissou Hat | A free knitting pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Zissou Hat | A free knitting pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Wrap yarn around a large fork several times until you have enough bulk for a pom. Cut yarn. Cut two pieces of yarn about 12 inches long and run through the center tine under the wound-up yarn. Tie these two pieces around the bulk of yarn and secure with a double knot. Remove from fork and trim the loops. Form pompom to your liking. Use the long strings you tied around the pom pom to secure it to the hat. Run the four strands from the top of the hat down into the inside using a darning needle. Tie the four pieces together and trim ends.

For the initial: Free hand embroider the initial into the front of the hat above the ribbing. I typed the letter “W” into microsoft word and set it to Futura font to get an idea of how to shape it.

Zissou Hat | A free knitting pattern from Alaska Knit NatZissou Hat | A free knitting pattern from Alaska Knit Nat


2 Comments

Rainbow Pippi Hat — A Free Pattern

I love me a good ear flap hat. It’s the first real knitting pattern I learned to follow. I reckon I’ve made more than 100 ear flap hats over the years. The pattern is timeless and practical for Alaska winters.

I’ve posted my ear flap hat pattern before, but I thought with knitting season underway that I’d bring it back with one of my favorite color patterns: random stripes. I used to call these junk or leftover hats because I use bits and pieces of yarn from my stash, but after I finished this hat last weekend it made me think of my literary friend Pippi Longstocking. I feel as though Villa Villa Coola probably gets nippy in the wintertime and that if Pippi were taking time away from the South Seas to visit back home with her pals Tommy and Annika, she would wear a rag-tag hat like this one. The braided cords with long tassels also remind me of Pippi’s kooky pigtails.

Feel free to get creative with your stripes, but keep in mind the yarns should all have a similar weight. If you look carefully you can see the green-blue stripe in the middle of the hat is a lighter weight than the rest and it’s slightly inconsistent. But I like it that way. If you don’t have enough bulky yarn, knit two strands of worsted at the same time. Just divide your color into two balls and knit them as though they were one piece of bulky.

Rainbow Pippi Hat | free ear flap hat pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Rainbow Pippi Ear Flap Hat

Sizes XS, S, M, L — I knit size small for a female’s head and size medium for an average male’s head. The BOLD text is the pattern I used for the Rainbow Pippi Hat.

Ingredients:
Size US 10 circular and double point needles
Several colors of leftover yarn, either bulky or two strands of worsted knitted together
Tapestry Needle
Pom pom maker (optional)

Abbreviations:

kfb = knit one stitch, then without dropping the working stitch, knit in the back of the stitch, thus increasing your stitch by one.

k2,p2 = knit 2, purl 2

k2tog = knit two stitches together

Ear flap (make 2):
With two double point needles cast on 4 stitches.

Row 1 (right side): Kfb, k2, kfb (6 st.)

Row 2 (wrong side): purl

Continue to kfb in the first and last stitch of every right side row and purl the wrong side. This will create the triangle shape. Keep going until there are 16 stitches for the XS, 18-S, 20-M, or 22-L. Set this flap aside and repeat with second flap.


Hat: Start the hat using the same color as the ear flaps. With the circular needle, cast on 12-XS, 14-S, 16-M, or 18-L stitches for the back of hat; knit across stitches of the first ear flap making sure the right side is facing you. Cast on 20-22-24-or 26 stitches for the front; knit across second ear flap. There will be 64-72-80-or 88 stitches in all. Join stitches carefully without twisting. K2, p2 on the front and back part of the hat (regular knit the ear flaps) for four to six rounds. This will make the nice ribbing and will prevent the hat from curling up.

Cut yarn, leaving a six-inch tail. Bring in a new color and knit 2 or 3 rounds, depending on your preference. Cut yarn, leaving a six-inch tail.

Continue knitting and changing stripes until the hat is about 5.5 inches tall. I usually go with 31 rows from the edge of the hat. Bring in the original color you used for the earflaps and brim and knit one row.
Start decreasing as follows:
Round 1: K2tog knit 6. Repeat for one round.
Round 2 (and all even rounds): Knit
Round 3: K2tog, K 5 for one round
Round 5:K2tog, K 4 for one round (this is where you should probably switch to the double points).
Round 7: K2tog, K 3 
Round 9:K2tog, K 2
Round 11:K2tog, K 1
Round 13: K2tog

Gather remaining stitches with a darning needle and fasten off. Weave in all tails. The inside of your hat should look pretty cool, with all sorts of colorful ends. Tighten all the knots you made and then double tie them. Don’t pull too tightly as you want the stitches on the outside to look uniform. Just play with the tension of the knots before double knotting. I then knot the yarn ends vertically to one anther, if that makes sense, and trim them. 


Rainbow Pippi Hat | free ear flap hat pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Braided ties:

Using all the colors from your stripes, cut 6 strands of yarn, about 24-inches long. Fold them in half and push the folded edge through the bottom of the ear flap from back to front. Draw the ends of the strands back through the loop and tighten the loop.  Divide the strands into three groups and braid them till they are about 8 inches long. Tie a knot at the end of the braid and leave two inches as fringe. Don’t cut the ends of the fringe until you’ve put in both ties. That way you can cut them evenly.

For the giant pom pom:

Use all your color strands together to create the pom pom. I love my pom pom maker, but you can also use the giant fork method. Once your pom pom is trimmed and pretty, secure it to the top of the hat using yarn and a darning needle. I like to go through the pom pom a few times to really get it to stay on the hat. Rainbow Pippi Hat | free ear flap hat pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Rainbow Pippi Hat | A free ear flap hat pattern from Alaska Knit Nat


4 Comments

Brioche Turban — A Free Pattern

I’ve been all about the brioche stitch lately. Ever since I found a left-handed video tutorial on HandsOccupied.com, I’ve been hooked! It’s really a simple stitch, involving yarn overs and slipped stitches and best of all (no offense to my good friend Annie) it involves absolutely no purling!

In just a week I’ve made two scrumptious, fluffy cowls and I felt ready to experiment with the stitch.

I put together this simple turban headband in just a day’s worth of mindless knitting. It went together quickly and with minimal effort.

I highly recommend checking out this gal’s tutorial, as it makes more sense to see this easy stitch in action than it is to read it.

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Brioche Stitch Turban

Materials:

1 skein of worsted weight yarn (I used Red Heart Boutique Treasure in the Watercolors colorway)

Size US 10 straight needles

Darning needle

safety pins (optional)

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Brioche stitch:

Cast on 10 stitches.

Foundation row: YO before you even start knitting (this is the strange part where it’s easier to understand visually), slip the first stitch purlwise, k1. Repeat YO, sl 1 pw, k1 till the end of the row.

Row 2: *YO, sl 1 pw, knit the 2 criss-cross stitches together. Repeat * to end of row.

Repeat row 2 till work measures about 40 inches, or a few inches less than twice the circumference of your head. It helps to “try on” the turban as you’re knitting it as your yarn’s stretchiness may be different from mine (see assembly instructions below).

Bind off all stitches. Cut yarn leaving an 18-inch tail.

Assembly:

Here’s a rough demonstration of how to assemble the turban using a sash since I’d already constructed mine by the time I wrote this post.

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Start with the middle of the strip at the nape of your neck and wrap the ends toward the top of your head. Twist the ends of the strip around twice and bring them back down toward the nape of your neck. Pin ends together.

Carefully remove the turban and pin together the long edges where they meet from the center loop toward the back of the headband. Using the 18-inch tail of yarn, thread a darning needle and sew together the short ends that you first pinned. Starting at the center back toward the front knot, sew together the long ends from underneath, running the needle through the wrong side stitches.

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

You can be as messy as you like because you won’t be able to see these stitches. Stitch together the long sides until you’re two inches away from the center knot. Tie off the yarn and weave in the end. Take a new 18-inch piece of yarn and sew on the other side of the turban in the same way, from the back seam toward the center knot. Here’s a crummy drawing of where the stitches should go:

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Remove all the pins, place on your head and admire how awesome you are for making a functional piece of clothing.

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat


Leave a comment

Homemade goldfish crackers

Homemade crackers are surprisingly easy. When I saw this recipe from Sheknows.com I just had to try it. I added a pinch of smoked paprika, which made for a deeper flavor. I happened to have a goldfish cookie cutter, so I wanted to see how homemade goldfish crackers would live up to store bought.

What came out of the oven was flakey, crunchy and downright cheesy.

Homemade goldfish crackers | recipe from Alaska Knit Nat

Homemade Goldfish Crackers

Adapted from a recipe by Sarah Crowder

Ingredients:

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

4 oz. cheddar cheese or mixture of cheddar and parmesan, grated on a micro plane or rasper

1/8th tsp smoked paprika

2 Tbs. butter, chilled and cut into small cubes

1/4 tsp. salt

2 Tbs. or so cold water

Homemade goldfish crackers | recipe from Alaska Knit Nat

Directions:

Add the flour, salt and paprika to a food processor and pulse till combined. Add the cheese and butter and pulse till just combined (it will look like crumbly flour). Turn on the processor and slowly add the water. Let the machine turn the dough into a ball. It should take less than a minute. If it doesn’t turn into a ball add a tiny bit more water. Remove ball, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Homemade goldfish crackers | recipe from Alaska Knit Nat

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface till it’s pretty thin. Either cut into Cheez-it like squares, or use a decorative cookie cutter. Place on two parchment-lined cookie sheets, with a little space between each cracker. Bake about 15 minutes, till slightly puffy and beginning to brown.

Homemade goldfish crackers | recipe from Alaska Knit Nat

Homemade goldfish crackers | recipe from Alaska Knit Nat

Let cool completely and store in an airtight container.

Homemade goldfish crackers | recipe from Alaska Knit Nat


Leave a comment

Retro Crochet Chevron Skirt

Recently a friend gave me a stack of old needlecraft magazines from the ’70s and ’80s. Most of the patterns are hilariously hideous, but there are a few that are pretty classic.

I’m more of a hat, scarf and mittens type of crocheter, but I was intrigued by a crochet chevron skirt from a 1981 magazine. This pattern I haven’t yet attempted, but I think it’s the only crochet clothing I’d be willing to wear (and not just on Halloween).

I’ve transcribed the pattern with the hopes that someday I will reference this post and actually make it. But if any of my readers attempt it before I do, please email me a photo of the finished product!

Retro Crochet Chevron Skirt | Free Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Retro Crochet Chevron Skirt

Sizes:

To fit 36-38 [40-42]-inch hips.

Length when hanging 26.75 inches

Materials:

Total of 16 [22] oz. (450 [600] grams) of worsted yarn (about 6 oz. each for colors A,B,C,D)

Size F crochet hook

1-inch wide elastic

7-inch zipper

needle and thread

Gauge:

15dc and 7.5 rows to 4 inches in plain dc; 17dc to 4 inches in chevron

Retro Crochet Chevron Skirt | Free Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Back and front (make 2)

Using A, make 148[172] ch.

Base Row: 1 dc into 4th ch from hook, 1dc into each of next 10ch, work 3dc tog. Over next 3ch, 1 dc into each of next 10ch, 3dc into next ch, repeat from * to end, but finish last repeat 2dc into last ch instead of 3dc. Turn. 145 [169] dc.

Next Row: 3ch to count as 1dc, 1dc into first dc, *1dc into each of next 10dc, work 3dc together, 1 dc into each of next 10dc, 3dc into next dc, repeat from * to end, but finish last repeat 2dc into turning ch of previous row and join B on last dc. Turn.

Repeat the last row, working 2 rows each in B, C, D, A, B, C and D and join A on last dc – so completing 16 rows from the beginning.

1st decrease row: Using A, work 3ch, skip first dc, 1dc into each of next 10dc, * work 3dc together, 1dc into each of next 21dc, repeat from * to end, but finish last repeat 1dc into each of last 1dc. Turn.

Next row: 3ch, 1dc into first dc, * 1dc into each of next 9dc, work 3dc together, 1dc into each of next 9dc, 3dc into next dc, repeat from * to end, but finish last repeat 2dc into last dc, and joint B on last dc. Turn. Using B, repeat the last row twice more, joining C on last dc of second row.

2nd decrease row: Using C, work 3ch 1 dc into each of next 9dc, * work 3dc together, 2dc into each of next 19dc, repeat from * to end, but finish last repeat 1dc into each of last 10dc. Turn.

Next row: 3ch, 1dc into first dc, *1dc into each of next 8dc, work 3dc together, 1dc into each of next 8dc, 3dc into next dc, repeat from * to end, but finish last repeat 2dc into last dc, and join D on last dc. Turn. Using D, repeat the last row twice more, joining A on last dc of second row.

3rd decrease row: Using A, work 3ch, skip first dc, 1dc into each of next 8dc, * work 3dc together, 1dc into each of next 17dc, repeat from * to end, but finish last repeat 1dc into each of last 9dc. Turn.

Next row: 3ch, 1dc into first dc, *1dc into each of next 7dc, work 3dc together, 1dc into each of next 7dc, 3dc into next dc, repeat from * to end, but finish last repeat 2dc into last dc, and join B on last dc. Turn.

Continue in this way, working in stripe sequence and patters as now set, decreasing on every 4th row, as before until 61 [71] dc remain.

Work 7 rows, so ending 2 rows in D, joining A on last dc of 3rd row.

Next row: Using A, work 1 ch, skip first dc, *sc into next dc, 1hdc into each of next 2dc, 1dc into each of next 3dc, 1hdc into each of next 2dc, 1sc into next dc, repeat from * to end, finishing 1sc into last dc. Turn.

Work 4 rows in sc. Fasten off.

To Finish:

Do not block. Using a backstitch seam, join side seams leaving 7 inches from top edge open. Sew in the zipper. Work catch stitch casing over elastic on wrong side at waist. Press seams lightly according to type of yarn used.

 

 


3 Comments

Dear Knitting and Crochet Followers…

I realized that lately I’ve only been writing cooking-related posts and I just wanted to reach out to all my fellow knitters and crocheters. I’ve been a busy little bee with my needles and hooks, so stay tuned. I’ll have something for you soon!

Xoxo,
Natasha

IMG_1801.JPG


Leave a comment

Wild Mushroom Marinara

Last week as I was scrolling through a local online events calendar I saw that Habitat Housewares was having a recipe contest. I’ve not entered a recipe contest save for last week when my husband’s work hosted a chili cook-off. I disqualified my recipe after discovering my husband failed to start up the Crock Pot properly and the beans were still crunchy.

That being said, I was determined to redeem myself purely for my own satisfaction. This contest also had some sweet prizes, namely a $500 gift card to a fantastic kitchen supply store and a Le Creuset dutch oven, retailing at $230.

The contest was for an original pasta sauce recipe. One of the judges was head chef at Villa Nova, one of the only originally Italian-owned restaurants in Anchorage (most Italian places are owned by Greek families here). The other judge was a local food writer who is all about local foods. The third was a local celebrity with whom I once performed “The Rocky Horror Show” at a local gay bar. I knew I had a chance.

Turns out I won second place and scored a pretty awesome dutch oven. First place was a stunning creamy Alaska seafood sauce that was a perfect blend of flavors.

I hope you enjoy my second-place pasta sauce.

Wild Mushroom Mariana Sauce | A recipe from Alaska Knit Nat

Wild Mushroom Marinara Sauce

Ingredients:

3 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil

1.5 oz. dried porcini mushrooms

6 oz. baby Portobello or crimini mushrooms, sliced

½ cup chopped onion

8 cloves garlic, crushed

2 Tbs. red wine

1/3 cup reserved mushroom water

42 oz. crushed Italian tomatoes (1 ½ 28-oz. cans)

2 dried red chilies

2 tsp. sugar

1 cup fresh basil leaves, roughly chopped

1 Tbs. fresh oregano, chopped

2 Tbs. butter

salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Boil 2 cups of water. Place the dried porcini in a bowl and cover with the boiling water. Cover and set aside for 30 minutes. Strain the mushrooms through a sieve and reserve the water. Roughly chop the porcini.

In a large sauté pan, heat the oil over medium-high flame. Add the garlic, turn heat to medium and cook till garlic is lightly browned. Add the porcini, Portobello and onions. Sprinkle with a little kosher salt. Sauté till onions are soft and mushrooms have lost much of their liquid, about 10 minutes.

Deglaze the pan with the wine and a couple of tablespoons of mushroom water. Transfer to a saucepan and set over medium-high flame. Add the tomatoes, remaining mushroom water, chilies, sugar, basil, oregano and butter. Salt and pepper to taste. Bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and simmer for an hour.

Pour over pasta of your choice, cooked al dente. Top with freshly grated Parmesan cheese. Serve alongside Italian sausage and steamed green beans.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 207 other followers